Tag Archives: Common soap aloe

Aloe maculata (Common soap aloe, Bontalwyne)

 

 

Aloe maculata 1 Aloe maculata 2 Aloe maculata 3

Greetings to all our Village plant enthusiasts. Welcome to this weeks’ “Weekly Plant of Interest”. This week we are looking at a succulent from a well known genus with a few cool medicinal uses.

Aloe maculata or the Common Soap Aloe (known as Bontalwyne in Afrikaans or lekhala in Sisotho) is a small aloe of up to 1 m in height. A. maculata is commonly found growing on north-facing rocky slopes in grasslands & open savannah, at altitudes of up to 2000 m A.S.L. This succulent is widespread throughout S.A. and has even been observed along the coast in the Western Cape’s Garden Route (Pers. Obs.). Its wide distribution range indicates that it can tolerate a variety of soil types and moisture regimes.

The leaves are green-red (redder when more water stressed), with pale white spots on the leaves surface. The leave tips are dry and the margins are often brown with small hard brown teeth.  The inflorescence is bright orange -pale orange/yellow, flat topped and appears to resemble a mop. The flowers are typically 45 mm in length and can be seen from June through to September. This plant adapted along with sugarbirds which have long slender beaks with which to access the nectar at the base of each flower. It is an ecologically important plant as it attracts sugarbirds to the area, and its presence in a landscape therefore has good implications for ornithologists. Uses for A. maculata include:

Medicinal

  • Used to treat colds
  • Soothes burn wounds, scratches, stings and insect bites
  • Natural mild “sun-block” , soap & facial rub to smooth skin

Cultural

  • Believed to protect against lightning as a lucky charm

Horticultural

Popular as a garden ornamental (hybridizes readily with a number of other aloes, both in the wild and in gardens).Weekly Plant of Interest

Greetings to all our Village plant enthusiasts. Welcome to this weeks’ “Weekly Plant of Interest”. This week we are looking at a succulent from a well known genus with a few cool medicinal uses.

Aloe maculata or the Common Soap Aloe (known as Bontalwyne in Afrikaans or lekhala in Sisotho) is a small aloe of up to 1 m in height. A. maculata is commonly found growing on north-facing rocky slopes in grasslands & open savannah, at altitudes of up to 2000 m A.S.L. This succulent is widespread throughout S.A. and has even been observed along the coast in the Western Cape’s Garden Route (Pers. Obs.). Its wide distribution range indicates that it can tolerate a variety of soil types and moisture regimes.

The leaves are green-red (redder when more water stressed), with pale white spots on the leaves surface. The leave tips are dry and the margins are often brown with small hard brown teeth.  The inflorescence is bright orange -pale orange/yellow, flat topped and appears to resemble a mop. The flowers are typically 45 mm in length and can be seen from June through to September. This plant adapted along with sugarbirds which have long slender beaks with which to access the nectar at the base of each flower. It is an ecologically important plant as it attracts sugarbirds to the area, and its presence in a landscape therefore has good implications for ornithologists. Uses for A. maculata include:

Medicinal

  • Used to treat colds
  • Soothes burn wounds, scratches, stings and insect bites
  • Natural mild “sun-block” , soap & facial rub to smooth skin

Cultural

  • Believed to protect against lightning as a lucky charm

Horticultural

Popular as a garden ornamental (hybridizes readily with a number of other aloes, both in the wild and in gardens).