Monthly Archives: March 2014

28th March 2014

With Easter on the horizon and the Gods of Winter mustering their wrathful breath for a frosty blow through our little valley, autumn promises to be quite an interesting place to be.

That’s right.  There are only 276 sleeps until Christmas Day, so time to start ironing your old wrapping paper and breaking out the gifts you didn’t want or like from last year.  Try not to give them to the people who gave them to you, however, or there may be a long silence ahead.  Talking of which, what constitutes a shopping day in this Year of Our Lord 2014?

For starters it probably depends where you are.  In New York, for example, 275 days means 275 shopping days.  In Lusaka, by contrast, it probably means 27 shopping days, while in our sunny village it depends WHO you are and what your sleeping habits involve.  Ten short years ago, Clarens slumbered until 09h00 of a morning, most mornings, and certainly didn’t entertain any shopping on a Sunday afternoon, a Monday possibly or a Tuesday certainly.  In fact, this was quite variable and depended whether or not the Shad were running on the South Coast or there was a newly-divorced person (or either sex) in town.

The net effect was, and to an extent still is, that shopping, dining and/or wining in Clarens was an uncertain experience.  The interesting fact, however, is that our clientele does not read from the same page of the Hymnal.  Since the days of Oom Paul, we have stumbled uncertainly into a tourist era that has been equally uncertain; the meandering Transvaalers and Free Staters who passed through our village, admiring the Holy Acre and Security Key Point that passes as our Square, have grown up and changed nationality, language and interests.  For starters, they now have the temerity to come seven-days a week; they simply don’t seem to know that Clarens celebrates Mondays and Tuesdays as alternate days of rest, or that we work from 09h00 to 16h00.  Sometimes.

Anyone who is on the Square from 07h00 onwards will have noticed squadrons of tourists, hands bunching Euros, Pounds and Dollars in their designer-jean pockets, stalking about looking for a place to off-load their newly-inflated largesse.  More to the point, we’re talking about those sacred days of the week when tourists are not supposed to be here.  Oddly enough, there are growing numbers of Clarens business people (okay, insomniacs) up and about at that hour, who are actually selling stuff; moreover, unless they suffer a chronic illness during the trading day, they discover that these self-same tourists are still financially-active after 17h00 – an hour when Clarenites are traditionally into their fourth beer.

So what to do?  Well, best we recognise that the game has changed.  We have just had a brilliant couple of months when we were supposed to be hibernating, and the markers for a great trading year are up.  Weekdays are open-season for shoppers of all descriptions and the Rand is plumbing new depths and due to meet the Australian dollar coming the other way.  The Clarens shopping experience has matured almost beyond imagining and the range of dining experiences has reorganised itself to actually be quite inviting.  We have the best little Brewery on the planet, a wonderful bookshop and even a mini-casino in situ, all of which seems to be quite appealing to our European cousins, judging from their steely-eyed circumnavigation of the Square of a morning.

So, dear Clarenites, gear up, spread your wings and open your doors seven-days a week: You have 275 days to make some money and have some fun, before wishing your dear ones a Merry Christmas and facing the challenges of 2015.  You have been warned.

The Twitcher

28th March 2014: Equinox

 

Guinea fowl chicks at The Clarens Country House


Table of Contents:

  • Equinox;
  • Snakes;
  • Victor Victorious: Victor Mokoena;
  • Self Drive from Clarens to Katse;
  • The Twitcher;
  • Community News: Letter to Cattle Owners;
  • Dihlabeng Primary meets Clarens Xtreme;
  • C.V.C. Rangers Receive First Aid Certification;
  • In a Heartbeat – New business in Clarens;
  • Coming Soon – Mexican Restuarant;
  • Coming Events: Passiespele 2014: Bethlehem;
  • Coming Events: 2 May, 2014:Supper Theatre On the Square: The fabulous Cat Simoni starring in Double “O” Bondgirl;
  • Coming Events: 3-4 May 2014:  National MTB in Clarens;
  • It’s super rugby time again;
  • Not on the mailing list?

 

Equinox

The Equinox was last Thursday (20th March 2014) so we are now officially in autumn.  (And in the northern hemisphere everyone has started celebrating the beginning of spring.) There are two equinoxes every year : March and September –  a time when the sun shines directly on the equator and the length of day and night is nearly equal.

The Equinox is also when according to legend the Mayan snake god Kukulcan returns to earth to commune with his worshippers and provide blessings before continuing on his was to the underworld.  And at every equinox  people from all over the world visit the Pyramid of Kukalcan (also known as El Castillo) in Mexico, where mathematically brilliant architecture and the sun/shadow patterns at  equinox combine to create an amazing illusion of a giant snake descending the side of the pyramid.

And, as if by some amazing coincidence, the snakes in our area seem to be particularly active at equinox. (See the story below.)  Not that I’m suggesting for one moment that the local Rinkals compares with the great Kukulcan, or that we could turn him into yet another tourist attraction for Clarens.

 


 

Snakes

 

Snake in ClarensThis is a good time of the year for snake spotting.  They’re particularly active in autumn, because they’re trying to fatten up in preparation for their winter hibernation. Problem is, that they’re very happy to search your house, garage, laundry or store room for food and are quite oblivious to the fact that they’re not welcome.  We had one having a look through our guest house on Monday.  Initial reaction?…….PANIC !  Fortunately, I had my cell phone with me, and Ollie and Detmar from Clarens Xtreme arrived with their snake-catching equipment in a matter of minutes. It took our coffee drinking, snake catching, adrenalin junkies a full total of 45 seconds to catch the snake and stowe it safely away in a bucket. Later on in the day, our non-paying guest was released in the mountains – in a spot where, Ollie assures me, he has a beautiful view of Lesotho.

What to do in case of a snake in your house:

Phone Ollie :  082 56 36 242

Keep an eye on the snake so that you know exactly where it is when Ollie and Detmar arrive to catch it.

Stay calm and ensure that the snake is not disturbed or threatened in any way.  (The snake is probably just as frightened as you are.)


Victor Victorious: Victor Mokoena

Victor Mokoena

by Natalie Dell

Meeting Victor Mokoena is like feeling the sun on your face after a few rainy days. The man has energy to spare and a megawatt smile. He is the Tourism Manager for the Northern Region of SANPARKS (Golden Gate) and the Chairperson of the Clarens Tourism Forum (CTF).

Born in Clarens in 1980, he is a loyal and committed Claranite. He attended the Clarens Combined School from Grade 1 to Grade 12. When I asked him about his first job, he proudly talks about the years that he was a gardener in the village, earning R12 per week. Although he is quick to point out that the money was not what excited him about the job – it was the doorstop sandwiches that he got from his employers that kept his motivation high. Read more


Self Drive from Clarens to Katse

Rose and Rod Smart from Howick in Natal recently visited Katse and sent us an article on their trip.  Anyone planning to self-drive to Katse will find the article full of useful tips and information.

Self-drive from Clarens to Katse Dam

Click here to read the full article


The Twitcher

With Easter on the horizon and the Gods of Winter mustering their wrathful breath for a frosty blow through our little valley, autumn promises to be quite an interesting place to be.
That’s right.  There are only 276 sleeps until Christmas Day, so time to start ironing your old wrapping paper and breaking out the gifts you didn’t want or like from last year.  Try not to give them to the people who gave them to you, however, or there may be a long silence ahead.  Talking of which, what constitutes a shopping day in this Year of Our Lord 2014?
For starters it probably depends where you are.  In New York, for example, 275 days means 275 shopping days.  In Lusaka, by contrast, it probably means 27 shopping days, while in our sunny village it depends WHO you are and what your sleeping habits involve.  Ten short years ago, Clarens slumbered until 09h00 of a morning, most mornings, and certainly didn’t entertain any shopping on a Sunday afternoon, a Monday possibly or a Tuesday certainly.  Read more


Community News: Letter to Cattle Owners


Environmental Education: Dihlabeng Primary meets Clarens Xtreme

Environmental Education is ongoing, and as you can see from the article below the CVC Rangers make sure that it’s fun.

Environmental Education Dihlabeng School meets Clarens XtremeThe sky was a perfect crisp blue and the morning was pleasant – perfect weather for 19 students of Dihlabeng Primary to enjoy a day of play at Clarens Xtreme.

As a result of winning a recycling themed poster competition, 11 students from grade 7 and 8 students from grade 2 got to spend an entire morning enjoying some really cool adventure activities including quad biking, put-put and zip-lining. The students were picked up early that morning by the C.V.C. rangers and several Working on Fire personnel and driven to their destination in (kids) style using the Clarens Working on Fire truck.
Read more


Clarens Village Conservancy Rangers Receive First Aid Certification


Clarens Village Conservancy Rangers get First Aid Certification
Damien Coulson

On Monday the 17th & Tuesday the 18th of this week the C.V.C. rangers took part in 2 days of first aid training. The attendees included the employees of Clarens Xtreme in addition to the rangers, all of whom were very kindly sponsored (at no small expense, may I add) by Ollie Esplin.

The course held at Clarens Xtreme, consisted of 1 full days combined first aid training, levels 1 & 2 followed by a half day combined training and examination. It included a theoretical component as well as hands on practical sessions. Topics covered included C.P.R. and other resuscitation based techniques; treatment of an assortment of wounds, ailments and injuries in emergency situations; survey of hazardous situations and reporting procedure – all drawing from real life scenarios.

Read more


In a Heartbeat – New business in Clarens


If you haven’t hear of In-A-Heartbeat yet, they are a new operation  opening up at The Base in Sias Oosthuizen Street, Clarens.  They describe themselves as an Info and Travel Bureau as well as Event Managers.  Mary Walker visited them a few days ago and got the low down.
Santa, previously of Dihlabeng Municpality in Bethlehem, is set to manage the concern under the direction of Werner, owner of The Base.   She told us that she has a background in communications, PR, marketing and tourism, and she believes that In-A-Heartbeat will enhance the tourism potential of Clarens and the surrounds, and will compliment and strengthen the town’s service to our visiting public.
The goal of In-A-Heartbeat is multi-layerd and will be rolled out in phases over a period of time.   Their immediate objective is to attract tourism accommodation product owners to register with them.   They are offering an accommodation booking service at a basic commission rate of 10%, and will negotiate full maintenance packages with interested parties in addition to this.
Following this they will phase in the other legs of the operation, which include team building and adventure biking packages, event planning and function catering among other things. Their commitment is also to fill a gap in the provision of tourism information, and they plan to provide this as part of their undertaking.
In-A-Heartbeat are planning to introduce the new enterprise by means of a launch in the near future. Clarens News will keep you up to date on developments.
Contact: Santa Bronkhorst – Manager: Events and Development
Office: 058 256 1699/082 727 1452  Email: santa@in-a-heartbeat.co.za


Coming Soon – Mexican Restuarant

Yet again we have something exciting to look forward to in Clarens. We are about to have our own Mexican restaurant opening here in our wonderful village of Clarens. The Mexican cuisine is considered a favourite by many people and it is always a good thing to allow our inhabitants and tourists of Clarens with another choice in dining. Preparations are in order as the venue is set to be where The Street Café was before.

Cecilia Morten, the owner of Restaurant Vito’s in Clarens explained that she is delighted to embark on a new challenge in starting this restaurant. She said that she will be joined by three other partners in this venture and they are all extremely excited. The name of the restaurant is Amigos as it is a well identifiable word or saying in the Mexican language meaning people. Opening a restaurant or business is a good decision because it strengthens our community by providing more job opportunities and this is but one of the reasons why we decided to start this restaurant she added. The Amigos restaurant is planning to open its’ doors during the month of April of this year if everything goes to plan. Should the owners experience any difficulties it might take a bit longer.

We here at Clarens News wish Cecilia and her business partners everything of the best and we cannot wait to try out their Taco’s amongst the many food options that the restaurant will offer.

Article and information by: Julio Ontong


Coming Events: Passiespele 2014: Bethlehem

 


Coming Events: 2 May, 2014:
Supper Theatre On the Square: The fabulous Cat Simoni starring in Double “O” Bondgirl

Phone Carol at Gosto’s for further details: 082 416 3687


Coming Events
3-4 May 2014:  National MTB in Clarens

Click here For further information


It’s super rugby time again

Watch all the action at one of our local Clarens pubs (and if you want to watch it on a big screen go to Artichoke).  The atmosphere is great –   almost like being at the game!

Click here to see the April 2014 fixtures


Not on the mailing list?

Click here to sign up 

Phoenix

 Phoenix 1Constellation of the Week

Johann Bayer, a German lawyer and astronomer, depicted the modern constellation Phoenix, for the first time in 1603. The constellation was named after the mythical Greek creature, the Phoenix. These birds are said to have lived on aromatic herbs, the like of Frankincense, Myrrh and Cinnamon.

When the bird reached the critical age of 500 years, it set about building a nest on the top of a palm tree using the mixture of aromatic herbs. Once the nest was built to the bird’s satisfaction, the Phoenix itself would set the nest alight. Shockingly the bird would die within the burning nest, but miraculously a young pheonix would appear from the ashes and continue to live its life cycle of 500 years.

 

Phoenix 2About the Phoenix Constellation

Chinese, Greek, Turkish and Egyptian are but a few of the cultures that revere the Sacred Fire Bird . The Phoenix was said to reflect the form of an eagle, with a brilliant scarlet and gold coloured tail,whilst its body was covered in the most beautiful purple, gold and red coloured feathers.

The seemingly small constellation, visible almost exclusively to those in the Southern Hemisphere, is associated with one meteor shower, the Phoenicids, which occur around 5 December annualy.

Nair al-Zaurak or “ the bright star of the skiff”, is an orange giant located nearly 80 light-years away and one of only two stars in the constellation with a magnitude brighter than that of 5.0 magnitude.

Did you Know?    

The Phoenix constellation has also been represented as an ostrich and a griffon.

The Egyptians believe the Phoenix to be a representation of the Sun.

The Phoenix is said to have magical powers and to be a bearer of luck.

Phoenix 3

How to find Phoenix

 

Phoenix is located in the first quadrant of the southern hemisphere (SQ1), and visible at latitudes between +32° and -80. Its neighboring constellations are EridanusGrusFornaxHydrusSculptor and Tucana.

 

 

GenevieveArticle and research by Genevieve Blignaut

Clarens News: January 2014

Scabiosa columbaria

Scabiosa 1 Scabiosa 2 Scabiosa 3

 

DamienGreetings to all our Village plant enthusiasts. Welcome to this weeks’ “Weekly Plant of Interest”. We’ll be looking at a not-so-familiar wild flower that is currently in full bloom…and has something to do with all the Meadow White butterflies Pontia helice helice we’ve been seeing lately.

Scabiosa columbaria (the Wild Scabious in English; Bitterbos in Afrikaans and tlhako-ea-pitsi in Sesotho), is a perennial that obtains an average height of 750 mm. It is usually found growing in grasslands and on basalt rock at altitudes of up to 3200 m A.S.L. This interesting wild flower is widespread all the way from the Western Cape through to Europe and Asia where it is believed to have originated from.

The leaves are arranged in a rosette formation arising from the base and are 40 – 180 long X 40 mm wide. The margins may be entire or deeply lobed. The flower heads are white – off-white/cream, 10 – 25 mm in diameter on a solid yet branched stem of 120 – 300 mm long. The flowers are actually white-pink, when viewed more closely and hermaphroditic. The calyx is easily recognisable with 5 purple-red lobes. S. columbaria flowers from end Oct – early Feb. After flowering, the seeds develop in interesting rounded bristle-heads, which gradually fall apart as the seeds ripen and are ready to be redistributed by the wind.

While photographing the small white flowers of S. columbaria, the author observed several small invertebrates, from beetles to wasps to bees to butterflies perching on the inflorescence. In fact several thousand of the Meadow White butterfly were observed in one location obtaining nectar exclusively from this flower despite many other flower spp. being present in relative abundance in the CNR. It appears that the Meadow White butterfly may have been selecting flowers preferentially based on the colour white. Uses include:

Grazing

A preferred snack of our favourite trail-roaming domestic animals; the cow, the sheep and the goat.

Traditional medicine

The plant is dried and used in traditional medicines.

Gardening

Makes for an attractive garden ornamental.

Conservation

It appears that the existence of the Meadow White butterfly and S.columbaria are inextricably linked. The Meadow White appears to provide an important pollination service to the flower and in return receives nectar which provides it with the energy needed for flight and reproduction. Without S. columbaria it seems that the annual migration of the Meadow White may not be possible.

Conservation Status

According to SANBI, S. columbaria is classified as of Least Concern.

The Emu

Clarens Skies Emu 1
Forming the head of one of our most popular constellations in the Southern Hemisphere, “The Emu”, lies the Coalsack. This nebula appears as a dust cloud near the Southern Cross, blocking out the sky almost completely.

Nebula’s are formed by the dust and gasses from long-dead stars, but also signals rebirth as new stars are born from these same gasses. The dust particles gravitate with immense power towards each other, in order to create the required pressure for the birth of a star to commence. Nebula’s are extraordinary life-creating life forces and each react in a different manner to the light bodies that surround them. Some nebula’s, like the Coalsack, appear as dark patches against the sky, (absorbtion/dark nebula), others absorb heat from nearby stars and glow as effect (emission nebula) still others only reflect the light of the bodies that surround them (reflection nebula).

Clarens Skies Emu 2

About the Coalsack

Running virtually the length of the Milky Way, lies the well-known constellation “The Emu”. The nebula at hand forms the head of the Emu, whilst the rest of the bird’s body can be seen as the shadow of the nebula extending to the ends of the Milky Way. The location of the Emu constellation acts as an indication of available seasonal foods. Carvings of Emu’s have been found scattered across Australia that line up with the Emu constellation. This correlates with the laying of the Emu’s eggs.

Different cultures have different interpretations for the Coalsack and the Emu. Some believe the dark patch to be a hole in one of the Milky Way’s rivers, whilst others believe the constellation and the nebula to be a pine tree with which one can ascend the heavens.

Did you Know?

Nebula’s can also be formed from stars that have died recently.

Smaller stars, like the Sun, can’t transform into a supernova, but the gasses expelled rather cause a planetary nebula. These nebula’s have nothing to do with planets as such, rather they were named “planetary” by William Herschel who named them based on their appearance almost 200 years ago.

The Coalsack lies almost 600 light-years from Earth and is 20 light-years across.

 

How to find the Coalsack

This nebula lies tucked between the brightest star (alpha Crucis) and Mimosa near the foot of the Southern Cross. The Coalsack then appears as a black patch of sky, above and to the right of the brightest star, Crucis.

Clarens Skies Emu 3

 

Genevieve

 

 

Article by Genevieve Blignaut

Clarens News: January 2014

Disa chrysostachya

Disa chrysostachya - 1 Disa chrysostachya - 2

DamienGreetings to all our Village plant enthusiasts. Welcome to this weeks’ “Weekly Plant of Interest”. We’ll be looking at a member of the Orchid family recently spotted in relatively low abundance at just 2 localities in the CNR.

Disa chrysostachya (the Torch Orchid in English; and mametsana in Sesotho), is a perennial that rises to between 250 & 650 mm tall. It usually occurs in damp grasslands, marshy areas or below cliff seep lines at altitudes of up to 2400 m A.S.L., and occurs from the Eastern Cape to Limpopo.

 D. chrysostachya has on average 3 – 5 densely overlapped leaves arising from the base of a thick fleshy stem. The inflorescence is tall and cylindrical and slender. The flowers are small, bright orange/yellow with a reddish tinge. A spur is present on each flower and hangs straight down. The flowers are 5 – 11 mm long, flowering from late December to mid Jan. This plant hasn’t been observed growing in great abundance, which would rather obviously make any sightings all the more dear. It’s growth form is also rather unusual and makes for an interesting observation.

Uses:

Ecology:

The flowers are often pollinated by sunbirds and a multitude of insects and offer a nectar rich meal in return for the pollination service provided by these animals.

Conservation Status

According to SANBI, D.chrysostachya is classified as of Least Concern.

 

Gladiolus dalenii

Gladiolus dalenii 1 Gladiolus dalenii 2 Gladiolus dalenii 3

 

 

DamienGreetings to all our Village plant enthusiasts. Welcome to this weeks’ “Weekly Plant of Interest”. We’ll be looking at a rather useful and aesthetically pleasing wild-flower recently spotted along isolated segments of the Spruit trail & Mallen Walk.

Gladiolus dalenii (African Gladiolus in English; Papegaai-gladiolus and khahla-e-kholo in Sesotho), is an indigenous species that rises to between 1m and 1.5 m tall. The Genus name Gladiolus (of which 14 species occur in the DMR) can be translated as “small sword” and refers to the appearance of its leaves. This easily-identifiable plant is found growing in grasslands and sometimes among scrub at altitudes of up to 2500 m A.S.L., and occurs from the Eastern Cape to Central Africa and even Western Arabia.

The leaves of G. dalenii are arranged in a loose fan formation, erect, approx. 20 mm wide, up to 320 mm long and grey-green in colour. The inflorescence may have support up to 7 flowers born on red-brown to green bracts. The flowers appear hooded and the colour is variable (although a red-fleshy orange colour is common). The flowers are considered “large” at 60 mm long by 30-40 mm wide, flowering from late Dec to early Feb. Uses:

Ecology:

The flowers are often visited by sunbirds (and insects)who are attracted to the flowers’ copious nectar. The sunbirds in turn provide an important pollination service to the plant.

Food

The corms of this plant are harvested and eaten by the Sesotho. The dug-up corms (known by locals as itembu or “fruits of the Earth”) are protein rich and provide a valuable source of energy to those who eat of them. The flowers are also said to be edible (Raw or cooked. The anthers are removed and the flowers are added to salads or used as a boiled vegetable) and yield relatively large quantities of nectar. A recent study however has shown the corms and leaves to be mildly cytotoxic in certain instances.

Traditional uses

Used in traditional medicines, placed in the medicine horn of traditional healers and also used as a lucky charm. It is rumoured to treat diarrhoea, chest ailments “caused by sorcery” and even sterility in women.

Gardening

Cultivars of this plant are grown in gardens throughout S.A. and in many overseas countries. It a popular garden plant and is easily cut and transplanted.  Some people have noted that the seeds are easily dispersed and may require careful tending to avoid garden contamination.

Other human use

The corms have been used as spinning tops by the Sesotho in children’s games.

Conservation Status

According to SANBI, G. dalenii is classified as of Least Concern.

 

Ranunculus multifidis

Rananculus multifidus 1 Rananculus multifidus 2 Rananculus multifidus 3

 

DamienGreetings to all our Village plant enthusiasts. Welcome to this weeks’ “bi-Weekly Plant of Interest”. We’ll be looking at a wild flower that seems unremarkable, yet as always when dealing with nature – there’s always something of interest to be discovered.

Ranunculus multifidus (Common Buttercup in English, Botterblom in Afrikaans and hlapi in Sesotho), is an erect perennial herb that grows to around 150 – 300 mm in height, is commonly found in damp ground near streams or wetland areas at altitudes of up to 2900 m A.S.L., and is widespread throughout S.A. It should be noted that a dwarf variety (at just 70 mm) of these species can be found at the upper reach of its eco-band/altitude.

R. multifidus may or may not have hairy leaves. One could deduce that the hairy leaves function as to trap moisture thereby retarding desiccation. If so, it is more likely that one would observe the hairy variety at higher altitudes where moisture is harder to come by. The leaves are a bright green with 2 – 3 pairs of deeply divided leaflets with heavily toothed margins. The inflorescence is branched and stems are hollow. Solitary flowers may be observed on small plants. The flowers are 15 – 25 mm in diameter and the 5 petals are a glossy mustard/rich butter-yellow colour. Flowers October – early Feb.

The Latin word multifidus means “divided or segmented” and likely refers to the appearance of the petals. The rangers have observed this plant at only 1 locality in the C.N.R., which despite its common name makes it not so common in the area. It is possible that the low density of this plant may be correlated with disturbed veld as a result of overgrazing or possibly overharvesting by traditional healers. Whatever the case one must exercise care in determining the cause of decline of a species. The pictures above were taken on a section of the Leucosidea Trail in close proximity to the Ridge Estate. Uses:

Gardening

The plant is simple yet attractive, and makes for an especially good garden plant in damp areas.

Traditional Uses

Used in traditional medicines to treat a variety of ailments including cures for headaches, urinary problems, ulcers, coughs, etc. The aqueous extract of R. multifidus shows high antimicrobial activity although the right concentration of the plant must be used in conjunction with several other medicinal plants or adverse effects may arise.

Conservation Status

According to SANBI, R. multifidus is classified as of Least Concern.

14th March, 2014

Oh the luxury!  Two whole weeks between Twitching, not a care in the world and twenty-five hours a day of shooting hints for amputees on television.  Can there be anything better than this?!

Of course the weather has put a bit of a damper on outdoor activity: no nude sunbathing on the square; the Vaal River rising precipitously and lapping at Bethlehem’s back door; Gautengers fleeing for their lives and finding breathless solace in the flesh-pots of Clarens.  Oh, the drama, the drama!  Our minor leaks and wet washing are not too bad, comparatively speaking.  But what to say this week, with a hindsight view of events stretching back fourteen days?

Well, for starters, what a show at Gosto’s last weekend, the new porro restaurant on the square!  Almost two-metres of tantalizing temptress, nom de guerre of Cat Simoni, wowed audiences two nights running with her take on Barbra Streisand.  Best bit, for those with staying power, was the impromptu jamming session late Saturday night (well, Sunday morning actually), with Hansie on piano and matching chords in short supply.  How good to have supper theatre in Clarens, with more to come.  Rumours of whisky bars at the Highlander and Mexican cuisine (??) up the road abound.  So gird your autumnal loins, dear Clarenites; the good times are about to get better.

Talking of which, has anyone else noticed how busy our little village has been in what has traditionally been called the New Year vacuum.  I can understand the Rand-exchange rate of course: Who wouldn’t travel at R423.63 to the British Pound?  But it is not just itinerant Europeans and Poms.  Accents have ranged across the spectrum, not least Afrikaans, even without the impetus of escaping Johannesburg three-metres under old mine water (why do perfectly nice people still live there?).  No, it is more than that: Things, dare I say it, are looking up.  If you discount the repeated waves of Germans in their condom-wrapped, extra-secret Mercedes test cars, there is still a real sense that Europe has actually discovered Clarens.

We’re not talking about thrill seekers after Kaalvoet, but proper people driving cars (rather than dozing in buses en route to Kruger Park); people keen to see Lesotho and climb a mountain or six; and spend a few hard-earned Euros on our little trinkets.  If you are doubtful, spend an hour or three on the square (oh, alright, in a pub on the square) and use your eyes and ears; the brewery is a good place to start, by the way.  The point is that these nice folks are multiplying rapidly and probably won’t disappear even if the Rand surges to R320.56 to the Pound.  So, bone up on your French; wear orange and speak a little Dutch; or go all out and make jokes in German.  Okay, maybe that’s a bridge too far, but be nice and remember that we are in fact a tourist destination – employing a lot of people and feeding a lot of families.  And maybe even having a lot of fun.

So what next?  Well, if you are into risking your all (no, silly, not getting married) a casino opens its doors tonight; the community braais for charity; the multi-coloured Kgubetswana Stadium opens; local author Don Emby (Soweto Burning) launches his book next week; and Peter Badcock-Walters opens his Gallery On The Square.  On the list of things not to do, is dump your garbage on the village pavements: Clarens manager Peter Reed has given his all to transforming the village and its environs (is the rising tourist traffic really coincidental?), and is none too tickled by ‘dumpers’ spoiling the picture.  You know who you are, so stop it before you get struck by lightning.

Oh, about the birds, which is my real remit: They’re actually not very visible at the moment, for the simple reason that my grapes are ripe and the Mynahs, Starlings and others are just too fat to fly.  Expect more (hungry) birdsong sometime soon however.  Whew.

The Twitcher

Habenaria falcicornis

Habanaria 3 Habenaria 1 Habenaria 2

 

 

DamienGreetings to all our Village plant enthusiasts. Welcome to this weeks’ “Bi-weekly Plant of Interest”. We’ll be looking at a member of the orchid family, Orchidaceae, from the widely distributed Habenaria genus – sometimes referred to as “bog orchids”.

Habenaria falcicornis is one of only a small group of wild-flowers that have featured in the bi-weekly Plant of Interest columns without an English common name. One could only surmise that the very reason for this upset is that the plant is really not all that common –at least not to the casual observer, and for that it earns its place as one of our “interesting” plants. It does however have a Sesotho common name: uklamkleshe. This not-so commonly observed wild-flower may be found in marshy or waterlogged grassland areas at altitudes of up to 2900 m. A.S.L., and its range extends from the Western Cape all the way through to Zimbabwe.

The Latin word falcicornis means “sickle shaped”, whilst Habenaria can be broken down into Habena meaning “strap/belt” and aria meaning “possessing”. Together these words refer to the strap like/long spur characteristic for each flower of the genus.

H. falcicornis is relatively hardy, growing to between 220 and 800 mm tall – likely as a result of the environmental conditions prevalent in the area in which it grows. It has a stout light-green leafy stem with long lanceolate shaped leaves of 4 – 20 cm in length. The inflorescence is rather loosely arranged on short stalks. The flowers are white – light green with yellow stamens. The spur is longer than the flower at 20-40 mm which tells it apart from its close relative H. dives, who’s spur measures a mere 8-15 mm. The former species flowers from Jan – March.

Uses:

Gardening

This plant would make an attractive garden ornamental and be well suited to gardens that border on marshy or seasonally waterlogged areas in the grassveld regions of S.A.

Conservation Status

According to SANBI, H. falcicornis is classified as of Least Concern.

 

 

Crocosmia paniculata

 

Crocosmia 3 Crocosmia 1 Crocosmia

 

Greetings to all our Village plant enthusiasts. Welcome to this weeks’ “bi-Weekly Plant of Interest”. We’ll be looking at an attractive specimen of the Iridaceae family.

Crocosmia paniculata (Falling Stars in English, Vallende Stetetjies in Afrikaans and khahla-ea-Bokone in Sesotho), is an evergreen herbaceous species that typically grows to between 1 – 1.8 m, usually in clumps rather than solitary. Krocos – saffron and osme – smell, refers to the saffron-like aroma of the dried flowers once placed in warm water. This vivacious wildflower bares an affinity for moist grassland areas and may be observed in close proximity to rivers, streams and forest margins. The plant has been recorded at altitudes of up to 1500 m A.S.L.

This particular specimen was found growing on a section of the Spruit hiking trail just above Lake Clarens adjacent to one of the recently installed wooden bridges (also in close proximity to an old willow covered in a form of bracket fungi/mushroom – giving the area a sort of magical ambiance and a slightly disconnected sense from the rest of reality).

The leaves of C. paniculata (not Cussonia paniculata as covered in an earlier PoI), are crimped and measure approx. 750 mm by 60 mm. The inflorescence is dense with ZigZaging (alternative common name) branchlets. These beautiful flowers are curved, tubular orange/yellow- scarlet red and around 75 mm long with 3 short (30 mm) tepals and sepals and 3 yellow anthers. Flowering Dec – end Feb. Uses:

Cultural uses

Used as a traditional medicine in the treatment of dysentery and infertility.

Gardening

Makes for an attractive and in fact rather spectacular garden plant when planted in the front garden, so long as sufficient moisture and semi-shade is provided. Many plants of this genus have been domesticated and hybridised for this very purpose. Has been known to become invasive in grasslands; however this has not been observed to be the case anywhere within the C.V.C.

Conservation Status

The SANBI conservation status for C. paniculata has been recorded as of Least Concern.

 

Article and photographs by Damien Coulson (Head Ranger: Clarens Village Nature Reserve)

Clarens Recycling Centre

Clarens Recycling Centre

Fouriesburg Road, Clarens
Contact:  Evon Else:   073-708-7832

Clarens Recycling Centre

The Clarens Recycling Centre in managed by the Clarens Village Conservancy.

Prior to the 26th of August of last year, our pint-sized recycling centre struggled along in the absence of daily management, relying on borrowed funds and causing a big headache for the C.V.C. committee. Then things changed and she happened – Mrs Evon Els, a recent inclusion in the Clarens community voiced her intention to turn things around at the rec. centre – and that she has. Fetching, sorting, bailing and transporting loads of recycled materials to their penultimate destinations is no easy – and certainly not the most pleasurable task. Yet since stepping in, the rec. centre has observed more than a quadrupling of capacity; the precision and pace with which items are sorted has increased dramatically and now up to 4 loads a day, 3 days a week may be transported. This all at personal expense and utilising personal equipment without the expectation of a salary – yet day in and day out Mrs Els is there, often before anyone else arrives and is usually the last to leave.

Currently there are 3 individuals employed on a contractual basis with extra hands being brought in at peak tourism times for Clarens. Watching these individuals and their leader at work is actually most interesting and the sorting process is an educational experience for anyone with a few moments to spare. Certainly it helps develop an appreciation for the recycling process as a whole and respect for those who are involved in it. A big Thank you Evon for your team’s efforts and an extended thanks to all who already are involved in recycling in Clarens – your efforts are helping to keep the streets of Clarens clean and are definitely having a positive effect on the environment.  (Extract from “It’s all about The R’s” – article written by Damien Coulson for Clarens News.   Click here to read the full article)

Click here for information on how, what, why and where to recycle

Recycling is very much part of Environmental Education.  Click onto the Environmental Educationpage to see how our rangers (with a lot of help from Sherri Gersh and Ollie Esplin) are turning environmental education into a fun activity.


wastemap

 

14th March, 2014: Growing Up

Clarens News Growing Up Zebra

 Table of Contents:

Growing up;

Greater Clarens Chamber of Commerce: Letter to business owners; What’s happening at the New Clarens Sports Stadium; Community Gardens :  Clarens comes out tops;
Clarens Village Nature Reserve:  Plant of interest:  Crocosmia paniculata; The Twitcher; Community News: Draft Environmental Management Plan; It’s all about the 3 R’s!; Fun D(Y)ay! at Dihlabeng Christian School; Clarens Recycling Centre; Other Community News; CCIA –  AGM; Cosmos – New varieties; This week:  Dihlabeng Christian School Autumn Fair; Book Launch:  Soweto Burning by Don Emby; It’s super rugby time again; Classifieds; Not on the mailing list?


Growing up

Take the Rebellie farm turn off the road between Clarens and Golden Gate, and drive up to the Rebellie farm entrance.  It’s an absolute joy to see how well last year’s baby zebras are growing up.   And Clarens too seems to be growing and growing. (See The Twitcher below.)   The new Clarens Sports Stadium is scheduled for opening on the 20th March 2014 (see Julio Ontong’s article below) and tonight sees the opening  launch of Mountain Breeze  – a new restaurant and pub in Sias Oosthuizen Street.   (Sorry – the opening party is by invitation only.)  The Greater Clarens Chamber of Commerce is also going from strength to strength. The only blot on the landscape is the weather (only if you’re not a farmer) which has resulted in the indefinite postponement of the Sensational Summer Sizzler Challenge for Charity on Sunday. Braai or no-braai, Clarens has some fantastic charities which could do with some help.  Have a look at the Community page on our website: www.clarensnews.com.


 Greater Clarens Chamber of Commerce: Letter to business owners:

Dear Business Owner,

This a brief update on what is happening at the GCCC.

The Chamber’s constitution has not yet been ratified as the representatives from Kgubetswana have not been appointed because the Kgubetswana Cooperative has concerns about the number of representatives that they will have on the Chamber board. This was discussed with a representative of the cooperative at a meeting held on Monday 10th March. The Cooperative has asked that the GCCC board be made up of 6 directors, 3 from upper Clarens and 3 from Kgubetswana. The matter of representation has been referred back to the facilitators of the Chamber constitution.

Notwithstanding the above, the three directors appointed to represent Upper Clarens have met on a number of occasions to start addressing issues of concern to businesses in Upper Clarens. The most pressing issue (as expressed at the public meeting in January) is municipal rates and following a meeting on 6th March with Peter Reed and Raymond Provos (CFO Dihlabeng Municipality), we are pleased to report that –

– The Dihlabeng Municipality is very pleased about the formation of the Chamber and looks forward to interacting on issues of concern to business
 – The business property valuation objections lodged by Clarens business owners have been taken to the appeal board and new property values have been set
 – The Municipality has lodged some objections where it feels the new values have been set too low
 – These cases have to go back to court for settlement
 – We will be sent a schedule of the valuation amendments within the next 10 days
 – It was agreed by the Municipality and the Chamber representatives that in cases where the municipality has no objection to the reduced valuations set at the appeal hearings, that the ratepayers (businesses) be refunded the difference between what they have paid for rates and what they would have paid at the lower valuations; obviously in the case of valuations subject to appeal by the Municipality, this will only be done on the outcome of the appeal.
 – A further meeting of the directors from Upper Clarens was held on Tuesday 11th March in which discussions were held with a representative of MTN about their desired requirements for the hosting of cycle races in Clarens going forward. Clarens Tourism Forum were due to attend this meeting and have discussions on collaboration/association/integration but cancelled at the last minute. An impromptu meeting was held about the possible inclusion, in a Carte Blanche report on cattle theft, of a piece on crime (specifically car theft) in Clarens. It was agreed that this was not a major issue for Clarens and not in the town’s interest and that nothing would be put forward.
In closing, the meeting with the Municipality was so positive that we now feel that the Chamber’s “career” has finally been launched.

Please advise your e-mail address to stubrelaxed@gmail.com in order to be included on our mailing list. Other contact details for the Chamber will be advised shortly.

Regards

Malcolm Hickman, Natalie Meyer, Carl Swerts


Aiden Wampach - Project manger Clarens Sports Stadium

What’s happening at the New Clarens Sports Stadium

Julio Ontong

On The 1st of March 2014 I sat down to interview Aiden Wampach. To all of you that are not familiar with Aiden, he is the Project Manager of the Clarens Sport Stadium that is currently still under construction. Aiden works for Mofomo, which is the Project Management company that is building and constructing the stadium.

Click here to read the full interview


Community Gardens :  Clarens comes out tops

Tsepiso Mosia Department Of Agriculture & Rural Development

 

Hi All

Its a great pleasure to inform you that on the 01 March 2014 we went to the Provincial Event of the vegetables competition.It was held at Glen Agriculture College in Bloemfontein.

Great news is that out of 7 categories won by Thabo Mofutsanyana District, Clarens participants won four. They were as follows:

 – Best Existing School Garden – Clarens Primary School.  (They won R15 000 &  a 10 000 litres water tank.)
 – Best Song – Thusanang Care Group , they won R5000
 – Best Dish – Clarens Cooks representing Thabo Mofutsanyana District – second prize of R10 000 and 10 aprons and 10 AMC pots
 – Best Official – Thabo Mofutsanyana District & Province – Tsepiso Mosia – won first prize of training worth R6500.

I would like to thank all the sponsors, Clarens Business , Clarens Community, all the participants, stakeholders, our mentor Mr Thabo Olivier, my colleagues, my family, MEC Mamiki Qabathe, Premier Ace Magashule and lastly GOD ALMIGHTY.

Clarens is so special and let us keep up the good work for our community. This vegetables project is an ongoing project and let us grow it to another level. Remember Clarens is the Trend setter and others just follow.

Thank you very much, GOD BLESS OUR VILLAGE.

Tsepiso Mosia Department Of Agriculture & Rural Development
0710791332  E-mail: mosiatsepiso@yahoo.com

Congratulations Tsepiso.  We know how hard you worked for this.  And congratulations too, to all the community gardeners who participated in this event.


 Clarens Village Nature Reserve:

 Plant of interest:  Crocosmia paniculata

Clarens Village Nature Reserve Crocosmia paniculata
Damien Coulson
Head ranger Clarens Village Nature Reserve

 

Greetings to all our Village plant enthusiasts. Welcome to this weeks’ “bi-Weekly Plant of Interest”. We’ll be looking at an attractive specimen of the Iridaceae family.

Crocosmia paniculata (Falling Stars in English, Vallende Stetetjies in Afrikaans and khahla-ea-Bokone in Sesotho), is an evergreen herbaceous species that typically grows to between 1 – 1.8 m, usually in clumps rather than solitary. Krocos – saffron and osme – smell, refers to the saffron-like aroma of the dried flowers once placed in warm water. This vivacious wildflower bares an affinity for moist grassland areas and may be observed in close proximity to rivers, streams and forest margins. The plant has been recorded at altitudes of up to 1500 m A.S.L.

This particular specimen was found growing on a section of the Spruit hiking trail just above Lake Clarens adjacent to one of the recently installed wooden bridges (also in close proximity to an old willow covered in a form of bracket fungi/mushroom – giving the area a sort of magical ambiance and a slightly disconnected sense from the rest of reality).

Read more


 The Twitcher

Oh the luxury!  Two whole weeks between Twitching, not a care in the world and twenty-five hours a day of shooting hints for amputees on television.  Can there be anything better than this?!
Of course the weather has put a bit of a damper on outdoor activity: no nude sunbathing on the square; the Vaal River rising precipitously and lapping at Bethlehem’s back door; Gautengers fleeing for their lives and finding breathless solace in the flesh-pots of Clarens.  Oh, the drama, the drama!  Our minor leaks and wet washing are not too bad, comparatively speaking.  But what to say this week, with a hindsight view of events stretching back fourteen days?
Well, for starters, what a show at Gosto’s last weekend, the new porro restaurant on the square!  Almost two-metres of tantalizing temptress, nom de guerre of Cat Simoni, wowed audiences two nights running with her take on Barbra Streisand.  Best bit, for those with staying power, was the impromptu jamming session late Saturday night (well, Sunday morning actually), with Hansie on piano and matching chords in short supply.  How good to have supper theatre in Clarens, with more to come.  Rumours of whisky bars at the Highlander and Mexican cuisine (??) up the road abound.  So gird your autumnal loins, dear Clarenites; the good times are about to get better.
Read more


Community News: Draft Environmental Management Plan

If you haven’t had a look at this yet, do so now.  Time is running out:  you only have until the 28th March to make comments.In terms of s. 39 (2) of the National Environmental Management:Protected Areas Act, No. 57 of 2003, the Clarens Village Conservancy (CVC), being the appointed management authority in terms of s.38 (2) for the Clarens Nature Reserve, hereby submits a DRAFT Environmental Management Plan (EMP) to the public and relevant authorities for consultation. This draft EMP is compiled in reference to, and should be read with, the Dihlabeng Spatial Development Framework which was approved in 2013.

Hard copies of the draft EMP are available at:

– the Clarens public library in Bester street, Clarens,
– the Book Nook, above the Methodist Church Hall in Clarens (Tue 10h00-12h00 and Thu 14h00 – 16h00),
– Clarens Xtreme Adventure Company, Swart street, Clarens,
– Tshepong public hall in Kgubetswana,
– the Dihlabeng Municipal Office in Main Street, Clarens,
– the Village Grocer in Main Street, Clarens.
An electronic copy of the draft EMP is available for download at:
https://www.dropbox.com/s/hs2nvg2xhcaqwvw/EMP-draft%20SM2.docx

All comments and suggestions to improve the draft EMP, and all requests by individuals or organisations to be registered as Interested and Affected Parties (I&AP’s), should be submitted to the CVC on the forms provided with the hard copies, or electronically to cvc@webmail.co.za, or in any format to any one of the CVC committee members listed in the EMP (and whose contact details are also available on the CVC website) by 28 March 2014, please.


It’s all about the 3 R’s!

Reduce, reuse & recycle. These are the words that encompass almost the entire concept of sustainability. The ways in which the 3 R’s may be practically applied are limitless; however they have a profound effect on the arenas of ecology, economy and human welfare.

Over the last decade the cost of living has really shot through the roof as petrochemical product prices keep going up, and in the last few years on an almost monthly basis. Globally, pollution of an anthropogenic nature has also never been higher. The need for ingenious solutions to common problems is therefore at an all-time high. Finding new means of cost-savings and improving overall quality of life requires that we now adopt these measures; we must adopt the 3 R’s. This week we give special attention to some people from within Clarens who are helping to realise the 3 R’s, and the manner in which they do this.


Fun D(Y)ay! at Dihlabeng Christian School

Clarens Village Conservancy Recycling Day at Dihlabeng School Clarens Clarens Village Conservancy - Recycling Day at Dihlabeng Primary School

 

 

 

 

 

 

In continuing with our theme we now focus on 2 more of the 3 R’s: Reduce & reuse. This past month saw the students of Dihlabeng participating in several C.V.C. hosted events. A new recycling station was also set up by Sherri & Laurence Gersh.

The first of which entailed a basic introduction to the concept of the R’s in the form of a PowerPoint presentation and recycling video, followed by a recycling game and interactive Q & A session and ended off with the announcement of a poster competition. Groups of students from each grade were asked to produce posters utilising reused materials and to explain how their posters best convey the concept of sustainability. The winners from the foundation and intermediate phases would be taken for a day of fun sponsored by Clarens Xtreme and the C.V.C. This helped to spark enthusiasm and the first event ended on a high note.

The second and main event held again at Dihlabeng involved the students from grades 2 – 7 in a series of 5 games, all of which were created using only recyclable materials and served as a means of showing the students that one can reuse and recycle and even have fun while doing it. It seemed that all who took part in the event thoroughly enjoyed it – including the students, WoF team, teachers, rangers and our committee member Sherri Gersh. The day ended with the judging of the posters and presentations and all the students were eager for our return to announce the winners.

Last week Wednesday was a cold, grey and windy morning. Thankfully we were all safely tucked away in the school hall where we announced the winners of the poster competition. Judging was not easy as many of the posters had their own merits. That’s why grade 7 saw both its teams win from the intermediate phase while a team from grade 2 in the foundation phase met our critical eyes.

The 3 R’s are part of our everyday lives whether we like it or not. The time is right to be a part of the solution. The time is right to improve our own livelihoods. Ladies and gentlemen, the time is right to start living again. One ant makes all the difference.

Clarens Recycling Centre

Recycling hasn’t always been big for Clarens, which is unusual considering that the majority of us living here are arty by nature and live outside-of-the-box, as conveyed by the wealth of art galleries, quaint and unusual shops and intriguing characters. All can be found right here in the little out-of-place, timeless Village.

Clarens Recycling Centre Prior to the 26th of August of last year, our pint-sized recycling centre struggled along in the absence of daily management, relying on borrowed funds and causing a big headache for the C.V.C. committee. Then things changed and she happened – Mrs Evon Els, a recent inclusion in the Clarens community voiced her intention to turn things around at the rec. centre – and that she has. Fetching, sorting, bailing and transporting loads of recycled materials to their penultimate destinations is no easy – and certainly not the most pleasurable task. Yet since stepping in, the rec. centre has observed more than a quadrupling of capacity; the precision and pace with which items are sorted has increased dramatically and now up to 4 loads a day, 3 days a week may be transported. This all at personal expense and utilising personal equipment without the expectation of a salary – yet day in and day out Mrs Els is there, often before anyone else arrives and is usually the last to leave.

Clarens Recycling CentreCurrently there are 3 individuals employed on a contractual basis with extra hands being brought in at peak tourism times for Clarens. Watching these individuals and their leader at work is actually most interesting and the sorting process is an educational experience for anyone with a few moments to spare. Certainly it helps develop an appreciation for the recycling process as a whole and respect for those who are involved in it. A big Thank you Evon for your team’s efforts and an extended thanks to all who already are involved in recycling in Clarens – your efforts are helping to keep the streets of Clarens clean and are definitely having a positive effect on the environment.

Damien Coulson head ranger Clarens Village ConservancyArticle and photography by Damien Coulson

 


Other Community News

Bird Interest Group: 
I would like to extend a warm invite to all bird watchers of Clarens and The Eastern Free State.

The SANPARKS HONORARY Rangers of the Free State host a birding weekend in Golden Gate every year during the 2nd weekend of February.

This year the event were attended by 64 guests. They spotted 132 species during the weekend.

Rick Nuttal a past president of Birdlife S.A and CEO of the National Museum in Bloemfontein and other birdlife experts normally take the guests on guided walks or drives through the park. Rick is also responsible for verifying the sytings.

We as Honorary Ranger will very much welcome some participation from our local birdwatchers.

Our next event will be the 2nd weekend of February 2015.

The Honorary Rangers were also responsible for the building of the Vulture Hide in the park. This is the first vulture hide in a national park in S.A.

There are still a challenge to help the park with the management of the hide. There is also a great need for farmers in the Clarens area to donate carcasses to the park to keep the hide functioning.

Anyone who wants more information can contact me, Div Bosman, on this e-mail address or phone me on the number 0824576743.

We would very much like the Clarens group to participate.

Thank you to the editor of Clarens News who keeps  us updated on all the events and your interest in plants and wildlife.

Regards

Div Bosman

Chairperson of The Free State SANPARKS Honorary Rangers.

 

Interested in being part of a Bird Interest Group?   We’ve been trying to contact other groups in our area – but there don’t appear to be any!  It looks as though it’s up to Clarens to get something going.  Clarens News invites interested persons to contact us (editor@clarensnews.com) with their input and ideas.


Community Notice Board

Please note that we now have a Community bulletin Board on the website:  To view Click here


 

Clarens Combined Churches in Action –  AGM

Clarens Centre Ballet Ministries

The CCIA delivered on its promise of entertainment at its AGM yesterday, and everyone who attended had a thoroughly enjoyable experience.
Click here to read Julio Ontong’s article on the AGM and what’s happening at the CCIA


 

Cosmos – New varieties

Cosmos just outside Clarens

Would you believe that there are a whole range of varieties of Cosmos to be had in the USA.  These varieties come in a range of colours: pink, orange and even chocolate.  Doubles, singles, short and tall. Personally, I don’t think you can beat the variety that grows so generously along the road verges.  (The pic above was taken yesterday on the road to Rebellie farm.)  The flowers may be simple – but oh, how they dance in the wind!


 

This week:  Dihlabeng Christian School Autumn Fair

Dihlabeng Christian School Autumn-Fair

Book Launch:  Soweto Burning by Don Emby

Bibliophile Booklaunch Soweto Burning

Click here for more information about the book


 

It’s super rugby time again

Watch all the action at one of our local Clarens pubs (and if you want to watch it on a big screen go to Artichoke).  The atmosphere is great –   almost like being at the game!

Classifieds

Looking for accommodation?  Do you have a house you want to rent out?  Need a job? Want to open a restaurant?  Remember to check out the classifeds section.
Advertising on the classifieds section of Clarens News is free.  All you need to do is to email  your advert to:
editor@clarensnews.com


 

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